Meowy Christmas

The Queen Mother of cute cat videos, Silent Night performed by cats. My favorite moment: kitty drinks from purple pond and then skates across it.

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5 Amazing Things About Cats

I confess I share Mayim Bialik’s distaste for certain doggy characteristics, which probably contributes to me being a cat person (although I have a theory that I could’ve gone either way as a child, if I’d grown up with both dogs and cats).

Alert: there is a sad note at the end of this video. If you want to skip that, stop it at 4:36.

User Review: Morning Joy Alarm Cat

A gray cat very close to the camera, looking up

USER RATING: ★☆☆☆☆

PROS: Compact, with sleek styling that is compatible with any decor. Comes in a wide variety of colors. Some of the alarm tones are pleasant. The unit is self-cleaning.

CONS: By some unfathomable oversight, this model has no settings! There is no time setting, no tone selector, and worst of all, no way to turn off the alarm.

Snooze. Sometimes you can get snooze to work, but the length is completely random, could be 1/2 an hour or two seconds.

Alarm Sounds. The alarm tone is also random. Although the tone options include a soothing hum tone, and a cute low-volume chirp, it seems like the shuffle usually gets stuck on the most obnoxious setting, which is loud, shrill, and grossly inconsistent with the name of this product.

Additional Comments.  The lack of a time setting is obviously a deal-breaking flaw, and we cannot recommend the Morning Joy Alarm Cat as a wake-up device. Since it is a multi-function unit with superior performance in some of its other functions (reviewed separately), we have tried to extend its dormant period by refueling it at bedtime. However, we have been unable to suppress the alarm function for longer than 6.5 hours. Best for users who supplement a short night’s sleep with an afternoon nap (see separate reviews for lap warmer and heart warmer features), or can sleep through anything.

The Secret Life of Cats

I always wanted my cats to have lives of their own – their own friends, haunts, and adventures that I didn’t necessarily have access to. I wanted them to be able to be cats, and for their relationship with me to be freely chosen.
A cat sits on the seat of a parked motor scooter
I wondered where they went, though. They explored back yards of neighbors I had never met, and could never have walked right into without committing a major social (and legal) faux pas. A six foot privacy fence that stopped me cold was no barrier to them.

As they got older and our neighborhood became less cat friendly, my anxiety trumped my idealism, and they became indoor cats. But there are still mysteries in their histories that will never be solved. Someone spayed one of them, in her early still mostly feral days. Which was fine, except I wouldn’t have gone to all the trouble of trapping her and taking her to the clinic myself if I had known! (That’s her under the towel in my Oct. 16th post, with her two daughters sitting guard). I never found out who it was.

Another time, she went missing for several weeks. I plastered the neighborhood with flyers, saying I didn’t mind if someone else adopted her, but could they please let me know so I wouldn’t worry? She eventually turned up, skinny and hungry. I later learned she had a propensity for getting trapped in garages and basements, where she would hide out for days without making a sound.

This blogger was lucky enough to get a glimpse into her cat’s offsite socializing. Maybe we misunderstood about the nine lives of cats. They aren’t consecutive, they are parallel.